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March 7, 1912

The circulating library will be open on Saturday evening from 7:30 till 9.

Many of our young athletes, impatient to show what they can do, are anxious to have a day of sport sometime about the end of June.  Aspiring record breakers kindly see E. Andison about it.  Arrangements must be made as soon as possible.

The Boy Scout Movement

     The Boy Scout movement has, by its success in teaching boys manly accomplishments, and helping to mould their tastes, in the right direction, won for it the approval of the right-thinking, sane people.  Nothing so proves the worth of the movement as a little personal contact with the lads who have received the training.  We must emphatically endorse  the good work of the society and trust a branch will be started in Cochrane shortly  Mr. C.W.Fisher, rJ.G. Tweed, J.A. Laird and other prominent men are very keen on getting it started.  Cannot a meeting be held to discuss the matter?

 

     "Haw, haw, haw," laughed a popular Scotchman in one of the stores on Saturday night last.  "What's the matter?"  asked a bystander, thinking he had probably been stricken with gold fever.  "I, I, oh dear, oh dear, I never heard anything so funny in my life.  Last week, haw, haw, haw, Bob Hewitt told me a story.  I have just gotten the point."

 Still Have Some Faith in Ghost River Find

 

     A number of Calgary men who have looked over the Ghost river mining district are not satisfied that it is a fizzle.  They do not go so far as to say that it is a great success, but they say that Brady, the prospector, should be given an opportunity to prove his assertions before the whole thing is condemned.  Brady is an old prospector.  He is convinced that he has made a find.  He has no object in deceiving any person and evidently is acting in good faith.  These men are not yet satisfied that it is all a fizzle.

Greatest Care of the Medicine Chest

A Party of Prospectors Started Out from Cochrane Well Supplied.

     Another party of prospectors went out from Cochrane on Saturday, and arrangements have been made by many others.  on Friday morning the Motor Transportation Company brought out a big party from Calgary, and on arriving at Cochrane collected a big stock of provisions from the local stores, whilst the Cochrane hotel and the Alberta hotel supplied the party with mineral waters enough to last these men a few days at least.  Realizing the vigorous nature of the climate and the hazardous work prospecting always entails, a medicine chest, bearing a popular brand, was also included in their list of necessaries.  Motoring as far as the Quigley mills, the eatables, drinkables, axes, shovels, picks and blankets were transferred to a mule train supplied by "Uncle" Phil Kaster. In their haste these gold workers just piled everything on together - sausages mixed with cigars, juicy beef-steaks mixed with green sheaves, bread mixed with horse blankets and tools - but the utmost precaution was taken with the precious medicine chest, which was carefully packed in rugs.

The Bowling Alley

     At last M. de la Repentigny has reached the giddy heights of his ambition, the bowling alleys, or to be more correct, Cochrane's Coney Island, over which he was moiled and toiled, sweated and fretted, is at last completed, and already dozens of men have patronized the latest addition to Cochrane's list of amusements.

     It is the hope of many to form a league composed of teams of ranchers, cowboys, merchants, clerks, quarrymen, miners and gold prospectors.  A valuable silver  cup is to be put up for competition.  For further particulars see Eddie Mose, the manager, and as for instruction in this fascinating, Ben will impart valuable information for a trifling consideration.

Glendale

     In the bad old days there was a certain tract of fertile land known as the Burnt Ground, but since its development by "Appy Omesteaders" it is known as Glendale, but the tropical nature of the climate of this district has also earned for it the title of "The Banana Belt".  The love for fun and frivolity which characterizes people of warm climes is abundantly shown in the doings of the residents of the district.  On the slightest pretext, they have a dance or junketing of some sort or other.  On Friday last a dance, masquerade, concert and supper were held in the school room, and a fine time was held.  Arcand, the violinist, supplied the music and songs were given by Miss Wearmouth, T. Wearmouth, T. James, G. Grafton, Nat Phelps, and F. Newsome.  In the masquerade the winners were Miss Wearmouth and Nat Phelps.

     The threshing around Glendale has again proven the adaptability of the soil for oats.  Mr. Craig, who threshed out about 700 bushels finds they weigh out at 38 lbs. to the bushel.

 

 

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